The first full range of International A-Level lessons ever available Online brings university entry possibilities to millions around the world

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A-Level students can take 100-150 hours of full online classes designed by online learning professionals for free no matter when and where

A level

(4th March 2018, Hong Kong) ITS Education Asia, a Hong Kong based school organisation established in 2005, has released the world’s first set of video-based lessons for the globally recognised International A-Level (link: http://www.itseducation.asia/online/distance-education.htm). With an entry point of zero cost, students from all backgrounds are now able to gain A-Level qualifications for entry to universities around the world in the following extensive range subjects: Accounting, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, Geography, History, Mathematics, Physics and Psychology.

The lessons have been specifically produced for maximum effect online learning by ITS’ professional teaching staff, all of whom have extensive experience in teaching the course to students in the classroom and achieving excellent examination and university entry results. Every student can now watch 25 sessions of video lessons per unit of A-Level (around 100 to 150 hours in total depending on subject requirements) absolutely free of charge. There are an additional set of 5 revision videos per unit for those wishing to upgrade.

Registration for free classes is a simple log-in process via the ITS Education Asia website (link) which also includes all the information students need to make informed subject choices depending on their needs and wishes. Having sampled up to 10 hours of free online A-Level courses, students can explore a comprehensive range of affordable online support packages to suit every need and budget for the remainder of their course, or alternatively continue with just the videos for free. To date the most popular and cost-effective packages, comprise the modestly-priced “Mentor”. Other expert support services include personal homework marking and fully live tutorial lessons with individual teachers. The courses allow maximum flexibility for students wishing to have more control over how, when and where they learn. They bring the A-Level into places where no traditional schools could ever hope to deliver such a high-end programme and to millions around the world wishing to study A-Levels to enter universities around the world. And of course they overcome quality international education’s biggest barrier to entry – price, by making A-Level classes online and extremely affordable.

ITS co-founder, and Oxford graduate, Danny Harrington explained, “based on our experience by far and away the best value package is “Mentor” which comprises all the video lessons on demand, access to notes, model answers, access to peer-to-peer forum and a free education planning consultation for a mere US$195/two units, which is a fraction of the cost of traditional face-to-face tutoring and allows flexibility of timing and without the need to attend a specific location and needing nothing but an internet connection to a simple smartphone, tablet or laptop.”

ITS sees these courses as ideal for students who

  • cannot access other schools/institutions to complete their exams;
  • face mobility problems that make it difficult for them to attend mainstream schooling;
  • are home-learners and looking for additional qualified expert, experienced teaching support;
  • do not wish or cannot afford to attend overseas boarding schools to complete their senior secondary education;
  • are studying the IB, BTEC or other syllabus but wish to add an additional subject to improve their academic portfolio as well as chance of university entrance
  • are at an international school and want to review their course content;
  • are post-compulsory-school-age who need formal qualifications, or
  • life-long adult learners wishing to enhance/or change their career or secure university courses.

“We have always sought to release students from the cost, time and locational limitations of mainstream education models while still allowing students to gain the qualifications they need to progress in the modern world. ITS Education Asia has worked hard and is proud to have devised the very first globally recognised and affordable online A-Level programme content for the most popular subjects taken. With this International A-Level project we believe ITS Education Asia has found a way to bring university entry possibilities to millions around the world.” Danny concluded.

For media enquires, please contact Sean Lai, Director of Admissions (China & Hong Kong) /

Danny Harrington, Director of ITS Education Asia at 2116 3916 or email to us:

[email protected].

 

-END-

 

Annex 1 Brief introduction – ITS Education Asia

ITS Education Asia operates two schools registered by the Hong Kong Education Bureau since 2005, offering actual classes at centres in Hong Kong and access to quality online courses across the globe. ITS Education Asia is an official Pearson, Cambridge ATS and UCAS centre and has rich experience in helping students to qualify for Oxbridge universities. ITS also provides university entrance consultation for students who wish to further their study in UK or US.

 

Annex 2 Our Professionals

 

 

Danny Harrington

–          M.A. (Oxford), DipHE (London), CELTA (RSA/Cambridge)

–          Co-founder of ITS Education Asia

–          Expertise: Geography, English, Theory of Knowledge, Philosophy and Religious Studies

 

Gary Hadler

      –     B.Ec., Dip.Ed. (Monash), M.B.A (NTU)

–          Co-founder of ITS Education Asia

–          Expertise: Economics, Business Studies and Accounting at all levels and has also been an IB examiner.

 

Andrew Hall

–          B.A. (Delaware)

–          Director and Executive Principal of ITS Education Asia.

–          Expertise: History and English Literature as well as providing teacher training and programme development consultancy for individuals and organisations.

Sean Lai –          LLB (CUHK)

 

 

Annex 3 Diagram of the flow

Steps Details
1. Choose ·         Go to the website: http://www.itseducation.asia/online/distance-education.htm

·         Choose the package you wish to register per subject (you can choose different levels for different subjects)

2. Register ·         Follow the links to register online
3. Learn ·         Watch the videos and enjoy the support services you buy
4. Apply ·         Apply for exams in your subjects either locally or in Hong Kong with ITS. ITS is Pearson Edexcel Academic Centre No. 92885
5. Plan ·         Get counseling on university choices from the ITS team

·         Apply to universities of your choice

6. Exam ·         Sit the exams at your chosen centre
7. Result ·         Get your results and go to university

 

 

Director of Admissions (China & Hong Kong)

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Is home-schooling a realistic option in Hong Kong?

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Is home-schooling a realistic option in Hong Kong?

By Danny Harrington, Founder, ITS Education Asia

Blog Photos

 

First of all let’s deal with the legal side because there is a general urban myth that home-schooling is illegal in Hong Kong. Not true. There have been cases where home-schoolers have been dealt with by the law but often the context has been missed out once these stories hit the media. In response to a question from Dennis Kwok to Legco back in 2015, EDB stated unequivocally:

“While we [EDB} would not as a rule disallow home-schooling, for the interest of the children, we would examine it case by case taking into account relevant factors on whether the family is likely to be able to provide children with all-round education..… Parents who wish to home-school can write or email to the EDB seeking an assessment.”[1]

So there you go. Home-schooling is allowed. There is a further grey area which is the extent to which expat children are considered to fall under the compulsory school-age laws. The current situation seems to be that expat children are treated much more leniently, particularly those of expats on temporary work-visas. You are always best talking to EDB though.

There are a number of reasons why expat parents may consider home-schooling as their best option in Hong Kong. There is the question of school place availability. It is incredibly difficult to access local schools as the competition for places from local families is so high and there are huge concerns about impact on education of being thrown into a completely different school language and cultural environment. Most expats look therefore to the international school system but there are limited places, dependent on year group, and quite a variety of schools some of which are more popular than others.

Recently, we have also seen more and more expat children with SEN [often certified from the home country] finding it nigh on impossible to secure an appropriate school place. There is plenty of controversy over the provision of SEN in English-medium schools at the moment and for many parents, while the argument rages, they simply have to do something about educating their child and so home-schooling is often the most immediate solution.

The other major factor is cost. An international family coming to Hong Kong these days will usually want their children to experience the opportunity as well. But we mustn’t forget that “international school” in Hong Kong means independent or private school anywhere else and of course the costs are comparable. At USD20,000/child/year up [and as much as USD40,000++] there aren’t all that many families that can find the spare cash to educate one, let alone two or three, children. Home schooling by comparison can be done very cheaply indeed for younger kids and even for children in exam years, such as IGCSE and A-level, getting support online both in terms of materials and expert teachers through live online classrooms doesn’t really need to exceed about USD5000/child/year although deluxe options could take this up to more like USD15,000/child/year. The beauty of the UK IGCSE and A-level is that you can take the exams as a private candidate at times of your own choosing, unlike school GPAs and the IB which can only be taken in mainstream schools.

The key questions are:

To what extent can you as a parent/family provide rich, varied, relevant and stimulating learning?

To what extent should you engage experts to supplement your efforts and your child’s self-learning?

What outcomes do you want for your child, such as the next step, and does that require formal qualifications?

How will you provide for your child’s social development without the ready-made community of a school?

There are a number of home-schooler support groups on Hong Kong and they are easy to find and access through platforms such as MeetUp. In this way you can both network to get the best academic process in place and to deal with the socialising issue. There are at least 33 families currently registered with the EDB for home-schooling but probably upwards of 120 families actually home-schooling and they are putting together an ever-improving support framework.

Home-schooling: it’s not easy, but it’s not illegal and it could just be what you’ve been looking for.

ITS Education Asia is a fully accredited Edexcel centre providing courses, tutorial support and examinations in UK IGCSE and IAL.

 
                [1]http://www.info.gov.hk/gia/general/201410/15/P201410150219.htm

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IGCSE and A-levels in January 2018

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by Ruth Puentispena, Exams officer, ITS Education Asia

The winter exam session held by Edexcel in January each year offers a wide range of international qualifications at IGCSE and IAL, allowing students to tailor fit their academic goals in preparation for university and the future. A trend in the exam candidates that sit every January shows that these students usually get a head start on their qualifications. IGCSE Candidates have a wide range of core subjects including Math, Science and English to choose from should they decide to sit their exams early. International A-level Candidates also take this opportunity to divide their work load by sitting some units in this exam session. This is particularly advantageous for Math students as most additional units are available in this exam session as well.

The IGCSE exam period for January 2018 is from January 8 to January 25, while the IAL exam period goes from January 8 to January 29. Given that this is a shorter period than the summer exam session, students are able to focus more on doing well in each exam as they can maximize preparations for these during their Christmas/winter break. An unspoken rule among parents is that they often use the winter exam session as practice for the summer exams by having their children sit their exams at ITS in preparation for the IGCSE exams held in June at their child’s school. This has almost always been to a child’s advantage. Should you wish to enrol your child at ITS for January exams, please note that we are now in triple late fees – you can enrol at any time up to the day of the exam.

You may email [email protected] should you need the relevant forms or would like to be added to the June alerts list – enrolments will open in March. If you would like more information regarding tuition in preparation for IAL and IGCSE subjects, please feel free to email us at [email protected].

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Strauss-Howe Generational Theory – is it the new crystal ball or pseudo-science?

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By Dr. Orville Leverne Clubb, Head ITS Education BTEC Centre

“There are only patterns, patterns on top of patterns, patterns that affect other patterns. Patterns hidden by patterns. Patterns within patterns.  If you watch close, history does nothing but repeat itself.  What we call chaos is just patterns we haven’t recognized. What we call random is just patterns we can’t decipher. What we can’t understand we call nonsense. What we can’t read we call gibberish. There is no free will. There are no variables.”

― Chuck Palahniuk, Survivor

strauss-howe-generational-theory-is-it-the-new-crystal-ball-or-pseudo-science

Today the word “millennials” is in common use.  I found that the word’s origin is from the “Strauss-Howe Generational Theory” by two pop historians, William Strauss and Neil Howe.  Strauss and Howe’s work is a theory of U.S. generational repetition. Their theory’s hypothesis states that US history moves in 80-year cycles.  Each generation moves through 20-year periods of influence in the cycle called turnings. There are four turnings in a cycle. Each cycle will have highs and lows. The fourth turning or last turning in a cycle is normally a major crisis in history like the American Revolution, the Civil War, and World War II. Each of the four generations embody fundamental characteristics, and these characteristics repeat themselves throughout history.

The cycle begins with an optimistic period of hope for growth and prosperity called a “High”. This period is immediately after the end of the previous cycle. The prosperity and wealth of the High period “turns” (turning) into a time of social unrest and uncertainty as fundamental questions concerning morality and ethics begin to be asked, this period being known as an “Awakening”. As an Awakening rolls forward, society begins to withdraw inward from wider social issues and causes, focus on amassing individual and familial wealth, and becoming distrustful of once trusted institutions and symbols of authority. This period of social value decay is called by Strauss and Howe an “Unravelling”. After an Unravelling, an accelerated countdown to a period of “Crisis” begins, climaxed by a major civilizational level crisis such as war or deep political upheaval surrounded by a number of smaller seminal events featuring further breakdowns in the economic and social fabric. Using this theory, our current cycle calls for a major defining crisis.

Steve Bannon, Donald Trump’s former White House Chief Strategist is greatly influenced by this theory and is looking for an apocalyptic “fourth turning”, such as WW III. This would allow the US to go through a cleansing and in a new “High” will return the US to former American values (make America Great again).

William Strauss passed in 2007. Neil Howe is still active and still trying to refine the theory.  In a resent web posting by Neil Howe “Where did Steve Bannon get his worldview? From my book”, Howe describes the fundamentals of the theory:  “We reject the deep premise of modern Western historians that social time is either linear (continuous progress or decline) or chaotic (too complex to reveal any direction). Instead we adopt the insight of nearly all traditional societies: that social time is a recurring cycle in which events become meaningful only to the extent that they are what philosopher Mircea Eliade calls “reenactments.” In cyclical space, once you strip away the extraneous accidents and technology, you are left with only a limited number of social moods, which tend to recur in a fixed order.

In an article by Tim Fernholz, Bannon was not dealt with in a very flattering manner.  “His views revolve around several key themes that can be explored at some length, but briefly summarized: American society is at a turning point in history and facing social collapse thanks to a decadent generation that has forgotten the values that made America great. Only by re-embracing white, Christian nationalism can the US regain its pioneering chutzpah. He even made a film on the topic, called Generation Zero”.

Generational theory is growing in popularity.  Dr. Graeme Codrington in an article “Detailed Introduction to Generational Theory in Asia” attempts to apply the theory to the countries of Asia, South East Asia and the Asia-Pacific regions. In his article Codrington points out theories of the cyclical nature of history is not new. He states: “Greek historian, Cicero; Greek writers, Heraclitus and Homer; Chinese philosopher, Lin Yü-t’ang, and the writers of the Old Testament (especially the book, Judges), show that this cyclical nature of history and generational development has not just been recently noticed.”

In computing we talk about “the software life cycle”, there is the “product life cycle” for manufacturing and even “Empire life cycles” theories. There is clearly merit in life cycle theory. It suits our view of our existence. But to what extent does that give it validity? Until next time….

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Downloading of Culture – 2

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By Dr. Orville Leverne Clubb, Head ITS Education Asia BTEC Centre

If someone were to put a proposition before men bidding them choose, after examination, the best customs in the world, each nation would certainly select its own.

– Herodotus

downloading-of-culture-2

 

I concluded my last blog titled “Downloading of Culture – 1” with: “A major conflict can occur if a child has been given a different culture by the home key people to that of the environmental culture of the child’s new formal school. As a child that moved from the Deep-South of the US to California while in primary school and had to deal with difference peer-groups, I can tell you that school peer-groups can be very mean and unwelcoming”.

As we continue the discussion with the “Culture Fundamentals Stage”, which is Piaget’s “Pre-Operational Stage”, imagine an immigrant child that is of different ethnicity dealing  with  entering a formal schooling system that is different from the child’s home culture.

In an article from The Economist entitled “Where immigrants go to school is more important than where they came from”, it was stated “Migrants can face a twin disadvantage. They are often concentrated in struggling schools. And, at least at first, they may suffer from having to toggle between languages at home and in class. Two-thirds of pupils born outside their host country use another tongue at home.”.  In addition to language, think of the additional ethnic/racial baggage such as physical features, food,  and religion.

Continuing with the computer analogy, we use “programming languages” to program computer behavior. Likewise, we use natural languages to programme human behavior, and store human cultural knowledge. The immigrant child now finds himself in a situation where he is being given formal cultural programming in the schooling system that does not match his home environment training.  This can be worse if the immigrant child is a minority in a school that is a majority of the external environmental culture.

Social Identity Theory explains in-groups and out-groups. It is in the Cultural Fundamental Stage that a human first start to seriously use Pejorative Language to describe a cultural out-group. I remember when I moved to California at the age of nine I was suddenly a “gringo”. Since then I have been a “haole” in Hawai’i, “gweilo” in Hong Kong , “hung mo gwei” in Singapore, “septic” in Australia, “farang” in Thailand…  These are racist terms used to define outsiders. (the hyperlink takes you to a list of racist terms *Warning some terms are very offensive*)  The immigrant child has to survive in a culture that he is not prepared for and may have to accept bullying and insults.

There can be a battle for the home culture to be kept intact from the home key people.  I have a feeling (but no proof) that this is the reason that some immigrant children are able to excel in their academic studies in the U.S. I remember my school days where the Asian students were always at the top of the class. Studying and achieving good grades was a way to gain social status since they did not fit into the main stream environmental culture.

By around 11 years of age the individual has advanced into the  “Cultural Functional Stage” the cultural equivalent of Piaget’s “Formal Operational Stage”. Members of a culture will normally have a fully functional understanding and awareness of the physical environment and culture that they are functioning in. They will understand the language, food, dress codes, gender expectations, etc.  However, I believe that the immigrant person has an identity crisis. Being pulled on one side by their programming in the Cultural Introduction Stage and continual pressures by the home key people to “know your roots”, date people from your own culture … Remember the idiom Birds of a feather flock together ?

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