The first full range of International A-Level lessons ever available Online brings university entry possibilities to millions around the world

Hong Kong Education, Latest News Comments Off on The first full range of International A-Level lessons ever available Online brings university entry possibilities to millions around the world

A-Level students can take 100-150 hours of full online classes designed by online learning professionals for free no matter when and where

A level

(4th March 2018, Hong Kong) ITS Education Asia, a Hong Kong based school organisation established in 2005, has released the world’s first set of video-based lessons for the globally recognised International A-Level (link: http://www.itseducation.asia/online/distance-education.htm). With an entry point of zero cost, students from all backgrounds are now able to gain A-Level qualifications for entry to universities around the world in the following extensive range subjects: Accounting, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, Geography, History, Mathematics, Physics and Psychology.

The lessons have been specifically produced for maximum effect online learning by ITS’ professional teaching staff, all of whom have extensive experience in teaching the course to students in the classroom and achieving excellent examination and university entry results. Every student can now watch 25 sessions of video lessons per unit of A-Level (around 100 to 150 hours in total depending on subject requirements) absolutely free of charge. There are an additional set of 5 revision videos per unit for those wishing to upgrade.

Registration for free classes is a simple log-in process via the ITS Education Asia website (link) which also includes all the information students need to make informed subject choices depending on their needs and wishes. Having sampled up to 10 hours of free online A-Level courses, students can explore a comprehensive range of affordable online support packages to suit every need and budget for the remainder of their course, or alternatively continue with just the videos for free. To date the most popular and cost-effective packages, comprise the modestly-priced “Mentor”. Other expert support services include personal homework marking and fully live tutorial lessons with individual teachers. The courses allow maximum flexibility for students wishing to have more control over how, when and where they learn. They bring the A-Level into places where no traditional schools could ever hope to deliver such a high-end programme and to millions around the world wishing to study A-Levels to enter universities around the world. And of course they overcome quality international education’s biggest barrier to entry – price, by making A-Level classes online and extremely affordable.

ITS co-founder, and Oxford graduate, Danny Harrington explained, “based on our experience by far and away the best value package is “Mentor” which comprises all the video lessons on demand, access to notes, model answers, access to peer-to-peer forum and a free education planning consultation for a mere US$195/two units, which is a fraction of the cost of traditional face-to-face tutoring and allows flexibility of timing and without the need to attend a specific location and needing nothing but an internet connection to a simple smartphone, tablet or laptop.”

ITS sees these courses as ideal for students who

  • cannot access other schools/institutions to complete their exams;
  • face mobility problems that make it difficult for them to attend mainstream schooling;
  • are home-learners and looking for additional qualified expert, experienced teaching support;
  • do not wish or cannot afford to attend overseas boarding schools to complete their senior secondary education;
  • are studying the IB, BTEC or other syllabus but wish to add an additional subject to improve their academic portfolio as well as chance of university entrance
  • are at an international school and want to review their course content;
  • are post-compulsory-school-age who need formal qualifications, or
  • life-long adult learners wishing to enhance/or change their career or secure university courses.

“We have always sought to release students from the cost, time and locational limitations of mainstream education models while still allowing students to gain the qualifications they need to progress in the modern world. ITS Education Asia has worked hard and is proud to have devised the very first globally recognised and affordable online A-Level programme content for the most popular subjects taken. With this International A-Level project we believe ITS Education Asia has found a way to bring university entry possibilities to millions around the world.” Danny concluded.

For media enquires, please contact Sean Lai, Director of Admissions (China & Hong Kong) /

Danny Harrington, Director of ITS Education Asia at 2116 3916 or email to us:

[email protected].

 

-END-

 

Annex 1 Brief introduction – ITS Education Asia

ITS Education Asia operates two schools registered by the Hong Kong Education Bureau since 2005, offering actual classes at centres in Hong Kong and access to quality online courses across the globe. ITS Education Asia is an official Pearson, Cambridge ATS and UCAS centre and has rich experience in helping students to qualify for Oxbridge universities. ITS also provides university entrance consultation for students who wish to further their study in UK or US.

 

Annex 2 Our Professionals

 

 

Danny Harrington

–          M.A. (Oxford), DipHE (London), CELTA (RSA/Cambridge)

–          Co-founder of ITS Education Asia

–          Expertise: Geography, English, Theory of Knowledge, Philosophy and Religious Studies

 

Gary Hadler

      –     B.Ec., Dip.Ed. (Monash), M.B.A (NTU)

–          Co-founder of ITS Education Asia

–          Expertise: Economics, Business Studies and Accounting at all levels and has also been an IB examiner.

 

Andrew Hall

–          B.A. (Delaware)

–          Director and Executive Principal of ITS Education Asia.

–          Expertise: History and English Literature as well as providing teacher training and programme development consultancy for individuals and organisations.

Sean Lai –          LLB (CUHK)

 

 

Annex 3 Diagram of the flow

Steps Details
1. Choose ·         Go to the website: http://www.itseducation.asia/online/distance-education.htm

·         Choose the package you wish to register per subject (you can choose different levels for different subjects)

2. Register ·         Follow the links to register online
3. Learn ·         Watch the videos and enjoy the support services you buy
4. Apply ·         Apply for exams in your subjects either locally or in Hong Kong with ITS. ITS is Pearson Edexcel Academic Centre No. 92885
5. Plan ·         Get counseling on university choices from the ITS team

·         Apply to universities of your choice

6. Exam ·         Sit the exams at your chosen centre
7. Result ·         Get your results and go to university

 

 

Director of Admissions (China & Hong Kong)

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Flexible learning in the 21st century

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Phew! We just finished the 2017 HKTDC Education & Careers Expo at the HK Convention & Exhibition Centre. As with all exhibitions, we had a busy 4 days chatting to students and parents as well as other educators about the options that they have to develop their education pathway.

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Mike Li – Head of US Admissions and Ruth Puentispena, Exams Officer

ITS Education Asia took on the theme of flexible learning for the exhibition. So many students, for whatever reason, are stuck with the impression that education means 6 or 7 years of secondary school, exams, 3 or 4 years of university, exams. Frankly this is an attitude that is simply plain wrong on so many levels. First and foremost it simply doesn’t have to be that way and sadly for many people, trying to fit themselves into the standard model when it is not appropriate for them leads to “failure” and a lifetime of wasted potential.

20170225_124356

Danny Harrington speaking about Flexible Learning

When I talk about flexible education, I mean it in 3 key ways and at 4 scales. We need to be flexible in how we learn, or the mode of learning. This can include teacher-led learning but also flipped learning [student researches before teacher involves]. It can include classroom, online & outdoor learning blended together across a course. And it can be assessed in many ways other than exams. Then we need to look at what we learn and when. Even within compulsory national curricula there is room for flexibility in what is taught to achieve the academic outcomes set by government. But we must ensure that children learn well beyond the academic criteria that school and the law sets out for them. Finally, we need to be flexible in how we apply our learning. Employers are getting better [e.g. employing Theology grads as systems analysts] and students [and those holding the purse strings] need to get better at choosing courses that are suited to their passions and skills and be confident that these will lead into gainful employment.

20170225_125126

Wanda Huang, Curriculum Developer, speaking about Experiential Learning

And all of this ought to be employed across the scales at which we view and organise education – national, local, school and individual. Few national and local frameworks seem to be truly enlightened but many schools do an excellent job of providing their students with the means to individualise their education within the school. Unfortunately, many do not and students need to realise that there are other options and that there is choice within any system. The Graduate School of Education at Harvard has some excellent open access research on all aspects of education . I particularly like the work on the 3 pillars – student, parent/family/guardian, school – which support our children in their educational development. By recognising that we all have responsibility we can begin to avoid the trap of just devolving everything to the school and government and begin to realise that we can take advantage of the flexibility there is to weave truly appropriate and rewarding educational outcomes for ourselves and our children.

ITS Education Asia offers a range of flexible learning pathways leading to globally recognised qualifications. Contact us.

 

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Why students who do well in high school bomb in college

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by Gary Hadler  Director, ITS Education Asia

why-students-who-do-well-in-high-school-bomb-in-college

This was a headline for a recent article in the Washington post Why students who do well in high school bomb in college. Below is a short extract from the whole article

“The first year of college is a tough transition, and for many students, a disillusioning one.
A study conducted last fall at the University of Toronto found that incoming students arrived with unreasonably optimistic expectations. On average, students predicted they would earn grade-point averages of 3.6. Those dreams were swiftly punctured. By the end of the year, the average freshman had only a 2.3.

What separated the high-achievers from the low-achievers? As any college admissions counselor will tell you, high school grades have always been the single best predictor of college success. But that does not mean that high school grades are good predictors. Research shows that differences in students’ high school GPAs explain only about 20 percent of the differences between students’ college GPAs.

What accounts for the remainder is still something of a debate and a mystery. Standardized test scores factor in, as does socioeconomic status. And increasingly, education experts think that character traits such as grit, perseverance and conscientiousness play a role.”

The article breaks students into “Thrivers” AND “Divers” and stresses a psychological idea of “conscientiousness” (Conscientiousnes is the personality trait of being thorough, careful, or vigilant. Conscientiousness implies a desire to do a task well. Conscientious people are efficient and organized as opposed to easy-going and disorderly.).

It is very interesting that the research only attributes 20% of the reason for doing well at higher education to High School grades. I was somewhat surprised at this.

Even though this article is about University of Toronto the research is also applicable to other universities. However, it probably does not include many students from other countries thus the problem of international students is likely to be a bit different. Therefore, I would like to add to this article with my own thoughts in relation to my HK teaching experience and some of the other things I would include that would help explain the reason some students ‘thrive’ and some ‘dive’ when attending tertiary education.

1. Level of tuition support received at high school not being there when at university – Many student’s struggle to replicate A* performances without the help of a tutor. Good tutors can increase a student’s grade average considerably and the lack of tutors may see the student’s grade average fall.
2. Maturity – Many HK students lack maturity as they have been brought up in a very sheltered environment. When they go to university the environment suddenly becomes the open real world. This provides a whole host of distractions that emotionally immature students may struggle to deal with.
3. Inappropriate (non desired) courses – Left to HK parents there would only be two occupations studied. ( Doctor or Lawyer) Strong students are pushed into these occupations regardless of personal preferences in many instances. If a student is directed into a career study area that they do not wish to do, performance can fall off very quickly.
4. Relationships – A new boyfriend or girlfriend can distract even the most hard working and dedicated students…
5. Environment – Moving from HK to another country can be difficult for many students. This can impact on their study.

My interpretation of this article is that the suggestion is being made if “all other factors are even” then Conscientiousness still provides a significant reason between why some people succeed and some fail.

I would welcome other people’s comments and feedback.




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UK university fees update

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by Danny Harrington, M.A.(Oxford), Founder, ITS Education

 

In line with what we were saying last week about universities beginning to raise fees under the current government decision to allow inflation-based increases, the first announcements have now been made. This is despite the fact that the increases are yet to be officially allowed.

Manchester, Durham, Kent and Royal Holloway are some of the names who have announced 2017 fees will increase to GBP9,250 per year from the current limit of GBP9,000. This is a rise of 2.8% at a time of record lows for the UK inflation rate which has been well below 1% for quite some time.

Interestingly, it was labour governments who scrapped the grants funding system and introduced tuition fees. The first were implemented in 1998 at GBP1000 per year and then raised in 2003 to GBP3000. In this sense, these rises are perhaps not too bad. Education inflation globally tends to hover in the 4-6% range. In the context of having to pay, these rises are not all that bad. The question of whether students should pay is a bigger idealogical issue.

Exeter University is one of the few so far to announce their 2017 fees remain unchanged. Of course these figures only apply to British passport holders who have met the residency requirement of 3 years prior to starting the course. Anyone else is classed as an international student and fees are much higher, typically starting from GBP15,000 per year. These fees continue to increase as per individual university needs and are often a way to cross-subsidise local students.

International students should continue to keep an eye on UK fees and the alternatives to going to UK for university. Many European universities now offer high quality courses taught in English and can be accessed using UK school qualifications. Many of these are also totally free depending on student status. Alternatively, there are now many online options and flexible ways to build a degree. ITS Education offers a BTEC HND in Business which is a globally recognised diploma equivalent to two years of a degree and which can be topped up to a full degree with one year of additional study at UK university partners. In this way, international students with lower budgets could be able to gain a UK degree for as little as GBP15,000 or about 30% of the cost of going to UK.




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Uncertainty order of the day for post-Brexit Britain

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by Danny Harrington, M.A.(Oxford), Founder, ITS Education

 

That is the only certainty anyone can currently see in Britain as a whole today and education is no different from any other part of UK life.

In amongst all the various changes, potential changes and many unknowns, the new Secretary of State for Education, Justine Greening, has been given a mandate for both schools and higher education and the media are flinging about all kinds of suggestions about what ideas she may have and what policies the government may follow. This needs to be watched closely. With parliamentary opposition in disarray, another decade of Tory government is quite possible, some may say probable, so policies formed now may well be seen through.

Most of what she does will impact on “home” students. At school level, the usual political footballs are school “type”, curriculum content & structure, and how students are examined/accredited. For international students, the last couple of years have seen the consolidation of international versions of UK school qualifications and it seems they are now unlikely to change very much, at least for the next five years. The rest of it is irrelevant to international students.

In higher education there are two big ideas being floated by government and they are linked. The first is to allow more providers  to teach higher level qualifications. Effectively, make it easier to become a degree awarding institution. The other is to allow fee increases beyond the current GBP9,000/year cap. Allowing the second will encourage the first, so goes typical market-oriented thinking. The fees of course do not impact international students who already pay considerably more. What will be of interest is what impact this may have on the availability of courses and their quality. International students thinking of going to the UK for higher education should watch both the rule changes and market changes carefully. It is unfortunate that immigration has been such a strong part of the current debate and the Brexit decision. It has made it all but impossible to do anything about international student visa numbers and conditions. In my opinion, the UK made a terrible mistake removing the right to work after completing a degree and that advantage is now lost, for a good while at least, to other countries across the world which retain it.

There will be an interesting battle then between the government and the vested interests of the universities, not least because the universities are divided on which policies they back and which they do not. With the status of European students and research agreements now unknown, universities face great uncertainty in their budgets. Some see Brexit as positive, some negative. There is a real mix of opinion and approach – poor planning has meant many who assumed a Remain vote have not thought through the other scenarios, the situation is fluid and unknown for those that have, and anyway universities are very different from each other.

One silver lining for international students may be that UK universities value them even more and make more of an effort to reach out to them with enhanced local learning options, teacher support, access to services and the like. Watch this space.




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