Marlborough College Malaysia – opens in September 2012

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Marlborough College Malaysia

The creation of Marlborough College Malaysia provides the opportunity for an educational beacon to shine brightly throughout the whole of South East Asia. Based on the best traditions of the English public school, Marlborough College Malaysia is a direct expansion of the UK school and is not a franchise.

The school will open its doors for pupils on 27th August 2012 after an ambitious building programme to provide outstanding facilities on a 90 acre site in Iskandar Malaysia, a ten minute drive from the Tuas crossing which links Malaysia and Singapore. It will endeavour to recreate the ethos, atmosphere, spirit and style of Marlborough College in England, (whilst recognising the environmental and cultural differences) and, to this end, significant numbers of Marlborough teachers, ex pupils and College Council members are involved with the establishment and development of the school.

When full, the preparatory school (age 4 – 11) will have 432 day pupils and the senior school (age 11-18) a maximum of 915 day and boarding pupils. The opportunity to be involved in an exchange programme with Marlborough in the UK will be part of the educational offering, as we endeavour to educate young people to be global citizens for the 21st Century.

In 2012, we are taking entry into all years from Reception to Year 10.

Our boarding community will enhance the quality of human interactions for those in our care, providing a safe environment in which pupils will have the opportunity to grow and maximise their potential. With dedicated Housemasters and Housemistresses and outstanding pastoral care, the structured independence of boarding life provides a platform from which all round development is assured.

We are guided by our belief that true education can be built upon a triple foundation of compassion, companionship and conversation.

Compassion
– the willingness and ability to see the world through the eyes of another is a value which springs from out Anglican foundation and acknowledges our duty to build a fair and just society

Companionship
– the sharing of life with friends and colleagues – both anchors us as individuals and strengthens us as contributors to joint endeavours and enterprise.

Conversation
– is the means by which we can develop intellectual curiosity and academic enthusiasm. Learning is not a passive process, and conversation involves both listening and speaking, demanding the gradual taking of responsibility for one’s own ambitions.

Further information may be obtained at www.marlboroughcollegemalaysia.org or [email protected]




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Finding a School in Singapore – Family Story

Blogroll, Singapore Comments Off on Finding a School in Singapore – Family Story

school placements Singapore

By Niki Eager

When we arrived in Singapore, Henry, our eldest child, was 8 months old. Having never been through the process of choosing a school I was definitely “green”. I wish I knew then what I know now – that all schools are phenomenal at writing a brochure that promises our children a happy, successful and fulfilling life; and that a secret weapon exists when choosing schools. That secret weapon is known as an educational consultant. They are people who are armed with local knowledge about the schools in your area, the sort of knowledge that you normally only learn of after being in the school for a while – the pitfalls and the pluses.

We eventually waitlisted Henry at 2 of what were generally acknowledged to be the best International schools in Singapore, and they seemed to be the most closely aligned with our family’s ‘ethos’. When we were accepted into our first choice (merely months before he was due to start mind you), we couldn’t believe our luck. But, I also felt some trepidation at the rather ‘grown up’ curriculum, uniform and hours that 4-year-old Henry would be keeping. When I then saw the school grounds for the first time (it had previously been under construction) my fear gave way to hope and excitement. The facilities made me want to go back to school!! (no small feat – I assure you).

Initially Henry seemed to settle in well, my husband and I were astounded at his development and learning (he is one of those kids who LOVES to learn). But then, after a few months, we noticed how exhausted he was – all the time. We spoke to the school, but they offered little support. Then another month later, it started. Henry began looking for reasons why he couldn’t go to school that day. We tried everything, talking and reasoning with him, cajoling him, even shameless bribes! Nothing could bring about a change in our son who a few months ago (in his old school) was wanting to go to school on Saturdays and Sundays! We talked to the school again – still no support, other than to blame me for being too clingy. Seriously?? Most fellow parents said to wait it out rather than losing our seat in such an ‘it’ school – after all, it was the ‘best’, so what if Henry wasn’t really happy right now??

By then I had met my good friend Sarah Bowler, an educational consultant. She listened to my concerns, and emphasised that schools are not a ‘one size fits all’, and she felt that she knew the perfect school for both Henry and our family. Oddly enough this was a small but expanding school, and yet the school consistently hires the highest quality of teaching staff and assistants – all of the teachers hold either Masters or Diplomas of education. They won’t even discuss much about the school without you first looking for yourself, preferring the students/families, classrooms and teachers to do the talking. I went back the following day with Henry. It took him about 90 seconds to confirm what I suspected – this was to be his new school.

At his new school, the children learn by experience, and as the word educate means (drawing from it’s Latin roots) they ‘draw out’ knowledge from within the children. This allows the children to develop the necessary fundamentals of self- worth/esteem, confidence and the ability to think/question for themselves. In short, his the school is actually doing what so many others promise.
Henry is happy again, happier than ever. We’ve learnt that the ‘biggest and best’, may not be regardless of what they, or mass consensus, says. And in a country where an inordinate amount of pressure is placed on young children to excel, Henry is truly forging ahead – now we’ve got requests for extra maths and mandarin classes.




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